Glacier Park Montana Books

Geology Along the Going-to-the-Sun-Road

I worked as an editorial assistant on the first edition (1983) of this book that uses photographs and a fold-out map to show ripple marks and fossil evidence of ancient times in the rock formations along Glacier National Park’s Going-to-the-Sun Road. I’m happy to see that the book’s new edition (2018) by Teagan Tomlin maintains the best features of the original while adding new photographs and updates.

From the Publisher

With this newly updated colorful and lively guide, Glacier National Park visitors can take a self-guided tour of the fascinating geological events that created the park’s majestic scenery.  Complete with an easy-to-read map that offers a three-dimensional perspective on the area’s geology.  Geology Along Going-to-the-Sun Road gives lay readers and geologists alike a unique opportunity to get behind-the-scenery at 21 stops along this famous highway. 

The Park’s red bus tours mention the large scale geology of the park from its cirque lakes to its glacier-carved arêtes. But they don’t usually mention the smaller evidence of the past within the rock itself. This is a wonderful guide for those traveling Sun Road in their cars or on their bicycles. Or, on foot.

The book includes information about the park’s rock formations, the Lewis thrust fault, and the actions of weathering and glaciation over time.

Malcolm

‘Mountain Song’ free Oct 15-17

My coming of age novel Mountain Song will be free on Kindle October 15-17, proving that good things can happen in 2020. 

Description

David Ward lives in the Montana mountains where his life was impacted by his medicine woman grandmother and his utilitarian grandfather. Anne Hill suffered through childhood abuse and ultimately moved in with her aunt on the edge of a Florida swamp. Their summer romance at a mountain resort hotel surprises both of them. But can they make it last after the initial passion wears off and they return to their college studies far apart from each other especially after an attack on a college street changes Anne forever?

Vistors to Many Glacier Valley in Glacier National Park will recognize many of the settings, including the old hotel. Visitors to Florida’s Tate’s Hell Forest near Carrabelle on the Gulf Coast will recognize the ambiance of this spooky swamp.

Hope you enjoy the story

Malcolm

Glacier Begins Vehicle Idling Awareness Campaign

from NPS Glacier National Park

West Glacier, MT – Glacier National Park and the Glacier National Park Conservancy are instituting an Idling Awareness Campaign aimed at educating visitors and employees about how they can reduce vehicle emissions in order to decrease pollutants which contribute to health problems and climate change. *

Idling pollution has been linked to respiratory problems such as asthma that increase vulnerability to COVID-19.

Transportation emissions play a significant role in fueling climate change, the effects of which are seen in the reduction of the park’s namesake glaciers. Vehicle idling occurs in Glacier in parking lots, at scenic viewpoints and trailheads, and while stopped in traffic and road construction. Glacier has received around 3 million annual visitors in recent years, most traveling by car. Limiting idling times to no more than two minutes will save money on gas and benefit the health of both the public and the park resources.

Glacier National Park is committed to reducing vehicle idling among employees and the public. Strategies for employees include enactment of a management directive limiting idling time for park vehicles, training visitor-facing staff on idling reduction messaging, and all-employee communications about idling. For park visitors, the campaign will focus on education and outreach.

The Glacier National Park Conservancy funded the design and printing of stickers depicting cartoon mountain goats traveling in a red vehicle with the slogan, “Be idle free – Turn the key.” The stickers will be free to visitors and will be available from rangers outside the Apgar and Logan Pass Visitor Centers and in the Rising Sun area. The logo will also be used in park messaging to remind employees and visitors to shut off their vehicles while waiting.

“This is such an easy way for each of us to do something small that can cumulatively have a big, positive impact”, said Doug Mitchell, Executive Director of the Glacier National Park Conservancy.  “There’s just no downside to this innovative program.  Not only will turning our cars off save fuel and make parking lots and pullouts quieter and more enjoyable for all of us, but one simple twist of the wrist by each of us will improve the air quality for all of us, human and animal alike.”

* Note: This program began in August. — Malcolm

BigAl’s Books and Pals Review: ‘The Sun Singer’ by Malcolm R Campbell

This is one of Campbell’s earlier books (first published 2010) and already his gifts for drawing warm characters and laying out a story so it flows towards and immerses the reader are well developed.

Source: BigAl’s Books and Pals: Review: The Sun Singer (Mountain Journeys Book 1) by Malcolm R Campbell

First Edition

Seeing this unexpected review appear on my Facebook news feed this morning makes my week (much more than yesterday’s after-supper lawn mowing), brings back a ton of nostalgia, and makes me wonder once again whether I made a very bad decision pulling it away from the agent who had my typewritten manuscript for the book in the 1980s.

The reviewer mentions that the book was inspired by the mountains of Glacier National Park Montana where I worked two summers as a hotel bellman. Those of you who have read my blogs for years also know that it was also inspired by a famous statue called “The Sun Singer” which I saw at Allerton Park, Illinois when I was (I think) in junior high school.

The novel is a bit earlier than the reviewer knows. I wrote it in the 1980s, got it accepted by a small but influential agent, and then waited for almost a year with no word. She liked the novel, but her small agency had also taken on a novel that turned out to be as huge then as The Game of Thrones is now. (I refuse to mention the title of the book or its sequels.) She said my wait would be an even longer one, so I took the manuscript back.

Was that a mistake? I guess I’ll never know. She might have found a publisher when she finally got around to actively shopping it, or she might not. The fact that an agent liked it led me to believe I could find a publisher who liked it. That took 24 years. I was gratified by the fact the book’s 2004 first edition was a “Foreword Reviews” book-of-the-year finalist but less than pleased that my publisher was iUniverse, a vanity press. But I would always wonder if the book might have received a wider audience in less time if I’d left it with that agent.

Current Edition

Later, several small traditional publishers wanted it, and this led to the 2010 edition. That publisher and I ultimately had a contractual disagreement, and that led to the current (2015) Kindle edition.

It’s interesting to me that several passages in the novel that happened more or less simultaneously were typeset by iUniverse in side-by-side columns. Nobody else has been able to do that since, including several other prospective publishers. I grew up in a letterpress-evolving-to-offset printing world where those columns wouldn’t have been a problem. “Progress” into a print-on-demand/Kindle world has taken away an option for small-press authors.

Nonetheless, this weird history of the novel doesn’t take away my gratitude that a reviewer found and liked the book after all these years. With a bit of luck, maybe my first novel will find a few more readers.

Malcolm

 

 

Why do old posts suddenly catch a lot of people’s attention?

When I log on to my WordPress dashboard, I see how things are going. Quite often, posts I think will have traction aren’t noticed while silly throw-away posts attract hundreds of readers.

Sometimes, I do a Google search to see if the subject of an old post that suddenly has hundreds of hits has been in the news. This time, it’s my 2011 post Many Glacier Hotel 1963, where the fantasy began. Why are people suddenly reading this old post?

  • I check the news to see if the hotel burnt down, had a string of murders in the basement, or got sued for not having an elevator in the annex.
  • As far as I can see from scanning Amazon, no new books have come out about the hotel that might cause people to put it into their search engines for more information.
  • President Trump isn’t staying there, nor has he unleashed a Tweet Storm about the place.
  • My publisher hasn’t made a surprise announcement to the press that I’m going to be there to talk about my two novels set in the historic structure.

So, I’ve got nothing. If any of you who went there see this post, I would like to know why you went there.

This is very a perplexing thing for a blogger. Why people read what they read. Lately, I saw that a lot of people arrived on my blog after a search for subject XYZ. So, I wrote a post about XYZ. Nobody read it even though my search terms index kept showing me that people were looking for more information about it.

Sometimes I think the Feds are doing this to make me go crazy to they can put me in a home, a One Flew Over the Cukoo’s Nest kind of home. Why would they do that, you wonder. My guess is that it’s because my alter ego Jock Stewart has contributed a lot of guest posts on this blog that made fun of the Feds. (Lately, the real news has become so crazy that Stewart couldn’t think of any way to satirize it.)

Okay, let’s pretend the Feds aren’t going it. Maybe some of you are doing it. You probably have a ringleader, some tough guy or badass chick from Chicago who calls the shots. Why would s/he do this? Kicks? Too much free time? A dislike of bloggers? Nurse Ratched withholds their meds unless they click on old blogs of mine to make me wonder why they’re clicking on old blogs of mine.

I’m sure there are other possibilities. The Russians hacked into my blog or maybe the Mafia did it. Or, possibly aliens from a place where no one has gone before.

Like those cop shows where a crime is committed in the middle of a crowded mall where nobody saw nothin’, I strongly suspect nobody knows why everyone’s headed out to that old Many Glacier Hotel post.

Okay, I can play that game, too, because my hacker software knows who you are and what you did. <g>

Malcolm

Malcolm R. Campbell is the author of fantasy and magical realism novels which, after youve read this post, shouldn’t surprise you.

Glacier Park 2019 Artist-In-Residence Applications Available – Deadline Soon!

from NPS Glacier

West Glacier, MT – Artists are encouraged to apply for the 2019 Glacier National Park Artist-in-Residence Program. The application period will be open November 1, 2018-January 1, 2019.

The Artist-in-Residence program offers professional artists focused time to creatively explore the park’s numerous and varied natural and cultural resources, and to share their work through educational programs and exhibits.

Each session will run for four weeks during June, July, and September. The sessions offer artists uninterrupted time to pursue their artistic discipline and provide artists with a furnished house located in the park.

Those selected are required to present several public programs during their residency. The programs must be related to their experience as an artist-in-residence and can be demonstrations, talks, exploratory walks, or performances. Digital images of selected work produced as a part of the residency may be used in park publications, websites and presentations for education and outreach.

Artists of all disciplines are encouraged to apply.  Applications are available online at https://.callforentry.org. More information on the program can be found at https://www.nps.gov/glac/getinvolved/air.htm and biographies of last year’s Artists-in-Residence can be found on the park’s website. For more information contact the Volunteer Program Office at e-mail us, or 406-888-7851.

 

 

New Cover for ‘The Sun Singer’

I have updated the cover of The Sun Singer to make the style similar to the covers of Mountain Song and At Sea. The text is the same inside with the exception of the photo credit for the new cover and an update to my list of other novels.

The hero’s journey adventure story is contemporary fantasy.

Description:

Robert Adams is a normal teenager who raises tropical fish, makes money shoveling snow off his neighbors’ sidewalks, gets stuck washing the breakfast dishes, dreads trying to ask girls out on dates and enjoys listening to his grandfather’s tall tales about magic and the western mountains. Yet, Robert is cursed by a raw talent his parents refuse to talk to him about: his dreams show him what others cannot see.

When the family plans a vacation to the Montana high country of Glacier National Park, Grandfather Elliott tells Robert there’s more to the trip than his parents’ suspect. The mountains hide a hidden world where people the ailing old man no longer remembers need help and dangerous tasks remain unfinished. Thinking that he and his grandfather will visit that world together, Robert promises to help.

On the shore of a mountain lake, Robert steps alone through a doorway into a world at war where magic runs deeper than the glacier-fed rivers. Grandfather Elliott meant to return to this world before his health failed him and now Robert must resurrect a long-suppressed gift to fulfill his promises, uncover old secrets, undo the deeds of his grandfather’s foul betrayer, subdue brutal enemy soldiers in battle, and survive the trip home.

The heroine’s journey story sequel is Sarabande,

–Malcolm

Glacier Park Launch Listed on National Register

from NPS Glacier National Park

Earlier this summer, the tour boat Morning Eagle was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Originally named Big Chief, she was built in 1945 and first placed on Swiftcurrent Lake in Many Glacier. By 1961, she had been transferred to nearby Lake Josephine and given the name Morning Eagle. The boat is a 45-foot long by 12-foot wide carvel planked cedar on oak frame vessel and has the capacity to carry 49 passengers.

In the fall of 1974, the boat was removed from the park for repairs, but it returned in spring 1975 and has stayed on Lake Josephine ever since, spending winters in a boathouse along the shore.

The Morning Eagle joins three other boats in Glacier that were added to the National Register earlier this year: the DeSmet on Lake McDonald, the Little Chief on St. Mary Lake, and the Sinopah on Two Medicine Lake. All four of the boats are owned and operated by the Glacier Park Boat Company.

This photo was taken in June of this year and shows Morning Eagle on Lake Josephine with Mt. Gould in the distance.

A boat with "Morning Eagle" written on the bow sits on a calm lake with a mountain in the distance.
Note from Malcolm: Apinákui-Pita (Morning Eagle) was a famous Blackfoot Warrior.

Glacier National Park – Howe Ridge Fire

From InciWeb: “Fire behavior increased yesterday yet there was minimal fire growth under smoky skies. The fire is estimated at 2,600 acres. Visibility hampered the CL-215 “Super scoopers” from working on the fire, however the Type I helicopter effectively cooled spot fires slowing the fire’s growth. Ground crews utilized existing trails to create fire breaks, continued to pump water for sprinklers for structure protection, and cooled hot spots at the residences on North Lake McDonald Road. Structure protection continued at remaining buildings at Kelly’s Camp. Fire behavior is expected to be more active today with increased winds and the potential of smoke lifting earlier in the day. The aircraft will extinguish spot fires and cool the head of the fire towards Stanton Mountain. Structure protection is the priority for ground crews and firefighters will continue to mop up hot spots along the North Lake McDonald road. Growth is expected on all sides of the fire today.”

Lake McDonald Lodge, across the lake from the fire, is closed for the season under an evacuation order. Avalanche Campground and Sprague Campground are closed. Going to the Sun Road remains closed from the foot of Lake McDonald to Logan Pass. Apgar remains in a “ready” status should changing conditions prompt an evacuation order.

NPS Glacier Photograph

According to the Great Falls Tribune on August 14, “The Howe Ridge fire in Glacier National Park destroyed several private residences as well as historic buildings owned by the National Park Service, the Park Service said Tuesday. Seven private summer residences, a cabin and the main camp house at Kelly’s Camp were consumed in the fire, which blew up Sunday night.”

KPAX TV reported this morning that firefighting efforts will increase as a Type 1 Incident Management Team takes over with additional resources and personnel.

–Malcolm

Free Amazon Kindle Book – ‘Mountain Song’

My Kindle novel Mountain Song will be free on Amazon February 12 through February 14, 2018. Let’s call it a special for Valentine’s Day.

DescriptionDavid Ward lives in the Montana mountains where his life was impacted by his medicine woman grandmother and his utilitarian grandfather. Anne Hill suffered through childhood abuse and ultimately moved in with her aunt on the edge of a Florida swamp. Their summer romance at a mountain resort hotel surprises both of them. But can they make it last after the initial passion wears off and they return to their college studies far apart from each other especially after an attack on a college street changes Anne forever?

Summer romances get a lot of attention in fiction. Our parents, teachers and those who’ve been swept up in them before used to warn us about them. Naturally, we didn’t listen because we thought that if we got involved with somebody, nobody would get hurt. Especially us.

Almost everyone I knew who worked at a summer resort hotel during the two years I spent at Glacier National Park fell into the clutches of a summer romance. A few ended up marrying each other and having wonderful long-term relationships. Most of us didn’t. This story didn’t happen the way I told it because we’re supposed to be discrete about such things. But she knows the real story.

I hope you enjoy the book and consider it a warning.

Malcolm