stormy weather, keeps raining all the time

What do you make of this?

What you see here on RADAR is the remains of hurricane (briefly) Nicholas. They’re like the haint that won’t go away. Ida haunted people all the way up into New England. At present, Nicholas appears to be heading more or less north. Is there a reason for this?

Those with PhDs in stormy weather can show you on a weather map how so-called “global winds” determine the route of a hurricane (or its remains). The models seldom agree 100%, so we tend to see hurricane path maps as a bunch of spaghetti–a twisted mass of potential routes.

My view, which isn’t accepted by anybody other than those who are considered kinky, is that the storms’ paths are determined by the people who want to experience them.  Obviously, credible meteorologists don’t include the human equation when considering where a storm will go next. Global winds, though, aren’t the whole story when you exclude people–en masse–who want or need a storm. That is to say, they call it into their neighborhood.

Why would they do that? Excitement, getting out of stuff, pitting oneself against the elements, doing heroic deeds, increasing one’s supply of “war stories,” mind-bending highs, living on the edge. Most of that is subconscious, so people can claim they don’t know anything about it and, yes, act offended when anyone suggests the storms go where they are most wanted.

What others believe about storms doesn’t bother me. That is to say, I have no agenda insofar as enlarging the scope of what meteorologists consider in their metrics. And yet, if you secretly enjoy the thrill of storms, then perhaps you know that you and others like you created that reality on your doorstep.

Gosh, is that crazy or what?

–Malcolm

Malcolm R. Campbell

Publisher: Thomas-Jacob Publishing

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I’d A Rather Not See Ida

“Ida’s catastrophic crawl inland has left at least four people dead and millions of people without power for what the Louisiana governor said Tuesday could be more than a month.” – Weather Channel

Growing up on the Gulf Coast, I’m used to stories like this focusing near where I live. At 18 miles inland, we saw a lot of damage, though nothing to compare with what Katrina and Ida brought New Orleans and neighboring cities. I must confess, as a kid, I found storms exciting; as a lot of neighbors said, “Sure, they were exciting when they got everyone worried and charged up and then veered off and hit somebody else.”

Perhaps I’ve matured, for that old childish excitement about stormy weather has disappeared. Maybe part of becoming an adult is seeing the death, destruction, disruption, and expense for what it is. As Afganistan comes to a horrible conclusion, I think a lot of people see wars the way children see storms: exciting and glorious and made for heroes and heroic acts. What a shame, for unlike Katrina and Ida, we have more control over such storms as Iraq and Afghanistan.

Meanwhile in northwest Georgia, we’re getting more rain than we need with a potential for flash floods. I hestitate to mention it because a soaking rain is a tempest in a teacup compared with the weather on the Gulf coast.

I feel sad for the people who couldn’t get out of the way or the “brave” and foolish people who chose to ride it out while having a hurricane party. If they live long enough, maybe some of those people will grow up.

Malcolm

 

 

Our calico cat hates storms

Thunder, driving rain on the roof, power outages, and anything else having to do with severe weather, Katy isn’t going to like it. At 3 p.m. today, the heavy rain made it so dark inside the house, I finally turned on a light in the kitchen. Meanwhile, there’s been a tornado watch in place most of the day here in northwest Georgia. This Weather.com graphic is a tip-off that we’ll have more rain tomorrow and for the rest of the year maybe:

I’m glad we got our yard mowing caught up yesterday. I wish I hadn’t gotten drenched while grocery shopping this morning. The rain was light until I walked out of the store with a cartload of food and, as they say, the bottom fell out. I would have been drier in a swimming pool.

The people on Facebook tell me I have rain for Monday’s errands because I’m not showing Mother Nature enough respect. Yes, I call her Baby Cakes. I saw that as a term of endearment. 99 and 44/100 percent of my friends don’t see it that way. Who knew?

Well, now the sun came out and the rain has stopped. The baby goats in the pasture across the road are enjoying their late afternoon. Katy’s stopped acting like a fraidy cat. But it’s all a trick. As soon as it gets dark we’ll have a rainy night in Georgia as Tony Joe White wrote in his 1967 song popularized by Brook Benton.

When that happens, I think I’ll go take a nap while Katy hides under the bed.

–Malcolm 

Malcolm R. Campbell

Publisher: Thomas-Jacob Publishing

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We don’t need no more tornados

“Parts of the South that endured severe weather outbreaks in consecutive weeks won’t be able to catch a break in the near future. AccuWeather forecasters say more volatile weather will arrive as soon as this weekend, and stormy weather could be unrelenting even into next week.” – Yahoo  

Look, if we wanted to play tag with dozens of nasty tornados, we’d move to Tornado Alley.

Thursday was a noisy weather day here in north Georgia: continuous rain, severe thunderstorms. The tornados occurred primarily in Alabama except for the one that devastated the Atlanta suburb of Newnan. We were on the edge of the tornado watch and will be again before the weekend is over.

We’re still under a flood warning from the last batch of rain. Now this, according to weather.com:

So, if you know Mother Nature, please let her know we don’t need no more tornados.

Malcolm