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Kylie Chan is creating Fiction | Patreon

Hi there! I’m Kylie Chan, an Australian writer of Fantasy and Science Fiction based on the Gold Coast.

My books are successful in my home country of Australia, and I’ve been shortlisted many times for awards in my country. Not so much overseas. This means that although I’m popular and well-known here, I don’t have the same sort of profile (and success) elsewhere. Australia has a small population (and book-buying market) so this dramatically affects my earnings.

I’m making enough to live on as a full-time writer: I’m not rich but I’m getting by. (I make much less than most people think I do. If I worked nine-to-five I’d be bringing in minimum wage. This isn’t really relevant, though, because 1. It’s a fourteen-hour-day and 2. I don’t really consider it work.)

Source: Kylie Chan is creating Fiction | Patreon

Students of literature and other arts know that in years gone by, many writers, composers, and artists had patrons. From time to time, I read of modern-day authors setting up subscription services and crowdfunding plans to help them raise money for their work. In addition to that, grants and awards help many authors complete work they’d otherwise be unable to do.

So, I support the concept and hope that Kylie Chan’s multi-tiered benefits for various levels of monthly subscriptions will help her travel for research and go to conventions for her promotional efforts.

I am currently on my second reading through her nine-volume Xuan Wu epic fantasy series (three linked trilogies) set in Hong Kong and its traditional celestial realms. It’s an enjoyable and ambitious work.

Many authors are not widely enough known to apply for grants and/or set up patron-style crowdfunding plans. Chan’s readers will note, of course, that she is published by Harper (not an easy thing to accomplish) so she is starting from a higher platform than small-press authors who find it next to impossible to even get their work reviewed by mainstream media outlets, much less have it considered by major competitions or best-of-the-year lists. Whether one goes Chan’s route with a major publisher or goes the self-published or small-press route, the odds of success for authors are more discouraging than going to Vegas and making a profit at the casinos.

I wish Chan well and I wish the media would expand its book coverage and actively consider saying something about authors who don’t have huge conglomerate publishers behind their work.

Malcolm

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4 Comments
  1. Sounds like my kind of epic. So I checked her out on Amazon. Er … could you be a dear and tell me what is the title of the first book of the first trilogy? There’s a lorra books listed and as they’re all linked I have no idea which came first. 🙂

    April 14, 2019
    • Here’s the Wikipedia list:

      Dark Heavens
      (the first trilogy)
      White Tiger (2006)
      Red Phoenix (2007)
      Blue Dragon (2007)
      Journey To Wudang
      (the sequel trilogy to Dark Heavens)
      Earth to Hell (16/12/2009)
      Hell to Heaven (1/8/2010
      Heaven to Wudang (24/5/2011)
      Celestial Battle
      (the sequel trilogy to Journey To Wudang)
      Dark Serpent (01/05/2013)
      Demon Child (01/06/2014
      Black Jade (2016)

      April 14, 2019
  2. Thank you! (I never thought to look on Wikipedia: doh!)

    April 15, 2019
  3. Easier to check than Amazon sometimes.

    April 15, 2019

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